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Stone rubbings exhibition shows historic landscapes

Updated: Oct 26, 2021 By Lin Qi chinadaily.com.cn Print
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A long-term exhibition at the National Museum of China shows rubbings of moya carved writings and characters from Yongzhou since the Tang Dynasty (618-907) to the modern time. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Moya, or inscriptions carved on polished cliffs, is a distinctive, centuries-old form of art in China. People in ancient times believed common media for writing such as bamboo, paper and silk would be easily ruined, while stones and rocks would help characters be passed down. They carved, often in large sizes, inscriptions on huge cliffs and high mountains so people of future generations would be educated and informed, learning the past as well as noted figures and their accomplishments. 

Yongzhou in Hunan province is reputed for its historic moya cliff inscriptions, serving as examples of fine calligraphy with historic and cultural significance.

A long-term exhibition at the National Museum of China shows a selection of rubbings of moya writings and characters from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) to modern times. Yongzhou was the habitat of several established artists and intellectuals, and the works on show reflect the cultural attainment of some of these figures and their social concerns.

When one gazes at the writings on show, one can picture a stroll along the original landscapes, as well as the natural scenery of Yongzhou which nourished the minds and souls of those writers centuries before.

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